Mushroom of the Month (MOM)

Learn a new mushroom or just refresh your memory! The M.O.M. page is a good source for background intel on mushrooms you may encounter in your wanderings.

Past Mushrooms of the Month

Hygrocybe laetissima (Waxy Caps) (by Noah Siegel)

Mushroom of the Month: March, 2016

Hygrocybe laetissima 
 
As deep winter settles on the Redwood Coast, you’ll begin to notice many small red, orange and yellow Waxy Caps (Hygrocybe)sprinkled through the understory of redwood forests; beacons of color in the dark duff. California enjoys a great diversity of Waxy Caps, many of which have special affinity for Coast Redwood, California Bay-laurel and Monterey Cypress habitats. Unfortunately, we are using 'borrowed' European names for many of these lovely waxy caps, and as we continue to learn about our mycoflora, we are realizing that many of our species are distinct, and deserving of their own names.  

Wavy Caps (Psilocybe cyanescens) (by Christian Schwarz)

Mushroom of the Month: February, 2016

The specimens in this photo show somewhat faded specimens. Note the wavy caps and blue stains on the stipe. Spore deposit is dark purplish-gray to very dark reddish-brown.

 

Psilocybe is primary genus of hallucinogenic mushrooms, containing such famous species as Liberty Caps (P. semilanceata), Cubes (P. cubensis), and the topic of this month’s article, Wavy Caps (P. cyanescens).

Almost always encountered on woodchips, Psilocybe cyanescens is an aggressive ruderal species, fond of disturbance in urban areas. It is especially common in the cold, wet winter months around the San Francisco Bay. Through a combinatin of unintentional and intentional transplantation by humans and natural dispersal, it has spread widely throughout the United States. In California, it occurs at least as far south as San Diego County, although it is fairly rare south of Santa Cruz County.

Honeys - Armillaria mellea (by Mark Benson)

Mushroom of the Month: January, 2016

(Reposted from posting on google groups with photos courtesy of Hugh Smith)

How about all this rain! 

Those were a beautiful display of Honey Mushrooms, Hugh!  Tight and turgid and just the right time to harvest.

Seeing them prompted me to write a few lines about Honeys not from any formal knowledge...but from my work experience and from 'experts' with whom I consulted for my clients in my work with trees.  I hope it is helpful to some of you.  I am not a scientist...just an observer.

Coccoras (by Katherine Elvin)

Mushroom of the Month: December, 2015

Amanita Calyptroderma Coccoras are one of my favorite mushrooms to see and collect.   The distinctive colors, thick cottony cap and striation on the cap edge makes this amanita a little easier to id.   If I am unsure at any point, it stays in the ground and I take away the memory, image and sometimes a photo.

Debbie Viess has a very informative link here on BAMMS web site which tells more about this species.

You can go here for Mushroom Observer.
     Amanita Calyptroderma - Fall Coccora - tan to light brown
     Aminita vernicoccora - Spring Coccora - light yellow

Marasmius plicatulus (by Christian Schwarz)

Mushroom of the Month: October, 2015

Marasmius Plicatilis Pictorial We’ve probably all run across Marasmius plicatulus during our walks in the woods; the tall, brightly-colored fruitbodies occur in many kinds of habitats every year, often in large troops. And what an excellent little mushroom to be so familiar. This species has a lot of features setting it apart from the rest of it’s marasmioid brethren: electric-sunset stipe coloration, oddly wiry-stipes (often tipped in pom-poms of creamy-white mycelium), and finely velvety caps often covered in beaded-up water droplets.

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